Have a Plan

Yesterday someone asked me to share my thoughts on the secret to building excellent things. I summarized what I know as:

“Put the customer first, have a plan, create a shared mission, get early victories, remove process, and make it fun.” – me, yesterday.

This was the formula my cohorts that built the Windows Phone app platform used. It worked. This is what the small team that created www.milelogr.com did.

“No battle was ever won according to plan, but no battle was ever won without one.”  – Dwight D. Eisenhower

It shocks me how resistant many entrepreneurs are to writing down a plan. It’s like they’ve been beaten down by the “VCs never read business plans, so don’t write one” tripe. Or maybe they were burned by the dense, unapproachable 100 page plans as babies (when they worked at BigCos).

Here’s the secret to planning: The shorter your plan the better.

But always have a WRITTEN DOWN plan.

Elon Musk had a plan for Telsa Motors. In 2006 he wrote a blog post and disclosed the plan as:

  1. Build sports car
  2. Use that money to build an affordable car
  3. Use that money to build an even more affordable car
  4. While doing above, also provide zero emission electric power generation options

The power of such a concisely written plan cannot be underestimated.

The plan for the Windows Phone 7 Application Platform, including the developer experience, fit on a single page. Yes, we had a 30+ page document that discussed all sorts of ideas and details, but the plan itself, the thing that served as our North Star fit on a single page. It concisely described all the things good plans cover:

  • Your purpose (some call this the mission)
  • How you’ll behave (your principles or tenets)
  • What’s important and what’s not (your framework for making tradeoffs, aka priorities)
  • Who’s responsible for what, and who’s not
  • When you’ll do things, and in what order

Our one page plan was the North Star that 100s of people across 4 Microsoft divisions marched towards over the 18 months we had dedicated to the project. As we headed north we ended up going a bit west and maybe a bit east, but we never went south. And that is why a plan is so important.

Have one. And make it as concise as you possibly can.

I’ve written a post dedicated to a great framework for planning: The 5Ps: Achieving Focus in Any Endeavor.

© Charlie Kindel. All Rights Reserved.

2 comments


  1. Great advice.

    It is also important to make sure that you re-read the plan frequently to make sure that you’re:

    - staying focused to the core tenants of your written plan,
    - identify that it needs to be re-written.

    Startups tend to be overly idealistic. The plan should change accordingly if you have intentionally pivoted away from your original written plan.

    • Thanks for the comment @facebook-690358547:disqus.

      IMO, the primary reason to keep a plan short is so that it is easily consumable…over time. If it is only a page long, it can be posted on the wall…

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